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eureka dunes death valley national park

21+ STUNNING Things to Do in Death Valley National Park 2021

Death Valley is a truly otherworldly place with insane vistas, extreme weather, breathtaking beauty, and all sorts of amazing things to do.

About Death Valley National Park

death valley national park california things to do mudcracks
The valley floor in Death Valley National Park at sunset

Situated on California’s southeastern border with Nevada, Death Valley National Park spans over 5,000 square miles of otherworldly vistas. The largest national park in the continental United States, Death Valley is a park for superlatives.

Death Valley is the hottest place on earth, the lowest place in North America, and the driest place in the United States. It is also the largest National Park outside of Alaska.


About Our Travels to Death Valley National Park

death valley national park pattiz
Me and my wife at Badwater Basin

I visited Death Valley for the first time on a whim in 2008 while on a road trip with friends. It was during the winter and we were amazed at how hot it still was.

Since then we have returned many, many times and can’t seem to get enough. There is something seriously magical about that desert wonderland. Many of the parks are otherworldly but this one might take the cake.

Things to See in Death Valley

Massive slanted valleys that go on forever and seem to lack only the crashed spaceship in the distance, snow-capped mountains, a year round waterfall (insane, right?), expansive Joshua Tree forests, abandoned mines, conifer groves, and some of the most stunning dune fields in North America comprise the park with the most morbid name.

Over the course of three trips we visited all of the main park attractions and then some, filming them to bring you the best things to do and see in the park which we have shared in this post.

If you’re visiting the park be sure to check out our full Death Valley National Park Guide!


Things to Know Before You Visit Death Valley

Entrance Fees: $20 per vehicle OR if you plan to visit more National Parks within the next 12 months we suggest you go ahead and purchase the America the Beautiful Pass(which you can purchase here) which gets you into all National Parks, Forests, Monuments, and more including 2,000 sites for free after a one time $79 fee.

Sunscreen: Use it. Lots of it. Especially this one which we never leave the house without because it plays nice with our dear friend, earth 🙂

Cell Service is pretty much non-existent in Death Valley so download your maps and plan accordingly.

Gas: Fuel up before you enter the park (even if you’re at like 3/4 of a tank) because the park is massive (we’re talking the largest in the contiguous 48 states). You do not want to run out of gas in the desert.

Death Valley Guide Book: This is the guide book we found most helpful for visiting the park & this one for day hikes.

The Best Map: We like this map best for Death Valley.

Water: Drink it. Lots of it. Don’t forget it in the car.

Food options are limited in Death Valley so plan accordingly. There is a general store at Stovepipe Wells that is fairly well stocked. Panamint Springs also has a store as does Furnace Creek. There are a couple of restaurants but keep in mind they are located hours apart from each other.

Best Time to Visit Death Valley National Park is in the winter and early spring when temperatures are manageable and visitation is down. During Summer Death Valley is often the hottest place on earth.


Getting to Death Valley National Park

There are many ways to get to Death Valley National Park. One of the most popular is flying into Las Vegas and making the 2 hour drive to the park. The second closest major city is Los Angeles at 4 hours away.

Four Wheel Drive: Four wheel drive isn’t an absolute *must* in Death Valley but it sure opens up your options as to the things you can see. I’d recommend renting a 4WD vehicle but you’ll be able to see plenty of amazing things without one.


The Death Valley Video

We created this 3 minute video based on our travels to Death Valley. It won some awards and was even featured by National Geographic. If you’re planning a trip to the park we encourage you to take a few minutes and watch our film.

To make this film we spent weeks in California’s (& Nevada’s) Death Valley National Park, mostly in February and March when the temperatures are more manageable. We traversed hundreds of miles hiking most of the parks trails to capture the park like never before.

RELATED: 14 BREATHTAKING National Park Videos to Inspire Your Next Trip


Best Things to Do Death Valley

1. Hike the Tallest Dunes in North America (maybe), Eureka Dunes

eureka dunes death valley national park
Eureka dunes at sunset | Death Valley National Park Things to Do

Eureka Dunes – My Favorite Thing to Do in Death Valley

Located in the remote Eureka Valley and situated at 3000ft elevation, Eureka Dunes is the most stunning dune field (I think) of the five in Death Valley National Park. Eureka Dunes are the tallest in California and perhaps the tallest in North America.

What makes this dune field even more stunning is the backdrop of the massive Last Chance Mountains. As if that isn’t enough to entice one to visit, did we mention they sing?

Yes, these dunes sing underneath your feet under the right conditions with a bassy resonance resembling that of a pipe organ.

RELATED: 10+ (FASCINATING) Death Valley National Park Facts You Probably Didn’t Know

eureka dunes death valley national park
Myself hiking down Eureka Dunes at sunset.

Not only are these dunes incredibly tall but incredibly steep which makes climbing them quite difficult and downright dangerous in the hot months (one of us *tossed the proverbial cookies* after reaching the summit to get the shot above).

Of all the things to do in Death Valley, hiking Eureka Dunes is my favorite.

To learn more about this location check out our Eureka Dunes post.


2. Experience the Lowest Point in North America, Badwater Basin

badwater basin death valley national park
Sunset at Badwater Basin | Things to Do Death Valley National Park

Badwater Basin

Badwater Basin is the lowest point in North America at 282ft below sea level. This salty wonderland features dazzling geometric shapes and record temperatures in the Summer.

Visitors can park at the Badwater Basin parking and walk out across the salt flats to the end of the boardwalk and out onto the salt itself which is a truly amazing experience.

Badwater Basin Hike

Distance: 1.8 miles roundtrip
Time: 45mins – 1.5 hours

Most visitors just hike out a few steps beyond the short boardwalk but to truly get a sense of the scale of the salt flats one can do the entire 1.8mile path.

To learn more about this location check out our Badwater Basin post.


3. Catch a sunrise at Zabriskie Point

zabriskie point best things to do death valley national park
Sunrise at Zabriskie Point | Best Things to Do Death Valley

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point is one of the most iconic locations in all of Death Valley National Park. This location is perhaps *the* best place in the park to watch a sunrise. This iconic location features panoramic views of Death Valley and stunning rock formations.

As one of the parks most popular locations crowds here can be quite large especially during the popular seasons. Be sure to show up early for sunrise to get a good spot!

There is a short, steep paved pathway that takes visitors from the parking lot to the viewpoint.

NOTE: Zabriskie Point is located at a much higher elevation than the valley floor so depending on the time of year you may want to bring a jacket.

To learn more about this location check out our Zabriskie Point post.


4. See mysterious rocks race across the desert floor at Racetrack Playa

racetrack playa death valley national park
Sunset at Racetrack Playa | Things to Do Death Valley

Racetrack Playa

The Racetrack Playa at Death Valley National Park features rocks that mysteriously move across the cracked desert floor leaving long trails and lots of intrigue. It is strongly advised that if you are planning to go the the Racetrack Playa that you do so using a high clearance vehicle as the road is pretty rough.

Make sure to pack plenty of sunscreen, water, & a snack as the closest services (or service) are a minimum 2-3 hour drive from the Racetrack Playa.

Damage to Racetrack Playa

This location is special and sadly has not always been treated as such. In recent years incidents have occurred with park visitors driving a vehicle on the Racetrack Playa.

Despite extensive efforts to repair the damage done the scars are still visible and will be for many years to come. DO NOT drive off marked roads here or anywhere else in the park. If you see someone doing so be sure to take photos, record their license plate number, and file a report at the closest ranger station.

To learn more about this location check out our Racetrack Playa post.


5. Hike amongst the technicolor cliffs of Artists Palette

artists palette sunset death valley national park
Sunset at Artists Palette | Things to Do Death Valley

Artists Palette

Artists Palette is a technicolor, kaleidiscopic display of multicolored rock in Death Valley National Park that must be seen to be believed. Located near the hub of Furnace Creek, Artists Palette is one of the most photographed spots in Death Valley.

The best time to visit Artists Palette is in the evening when temperatures are cooler and the sun hits the rocks just so to really make their color pop. Harsh midday sun mutes the vivid colors and should be avoided if possible. Cloudy days make for great photos at Artists Palette.

To learn more about this location check out our Artists Palette post.


6. Play in the Death Valley’s most popular sandbox, Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes

mesquite dunes death valley national park
Sunrise at Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes | Things to Do Death Valley National Park

Mesquite Flat Dunes

Mesquite Flat Dunes is the most popular of the five dune fields located in Death Valley National Park. Seemingly endless golden dunes roll off toward the horizon with a backdrop of purple mountain majesty.

Located next to Stovepipe Wells village, Mesquite Flat Dunes is an easy stop and a must-see for anyone visiting Death Valley.

Make sure to layer up with sunscreen prior to hiking into the dunes and bring plenty of water. There is no natural cover from the sun and the sand can be extremely hot to the touch.

To learn more about this location check out our Mesquite Flat Dunes post.


7. Visit Joshua Tree, in Death Valley, via the Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest

lee flat joshua tree forest
Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest | Death Valley Things to Do

Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest

When most folks think about the park for Joshua Trees, Joshua Tree National Park is the one that comes to mind. Well, it turns out Death Valley has massive Joshua Tree forests and perhaps none as large as the Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest located near the west entrance to the park.

Lee Flat is situated at a much higher elevation than the valley floors and as such has a very different feel. Temperatures can be 20 or more degrees different from what visitors find at Badwater Basin.

Sunset is an especially beautiful time to visit this area to watch the light turn colors and sweep across this vast landscape.

To learn more about this location check out our Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest post.


8. Gaze into the volcanic abyss at Ubehebe Crater

little ubehebe crater death valley national park
Little Ubehebe Crater | Death Valley National Park Things to Do

Ubehebe Crater

Ubehebe Crater, pronounced “YOU-BE-HE-BE”, was not created by a meteor strike but rather volcanic activity. Located toward the northern end of Death Valley National Park near Scotty’s Castle, this site is worth the stop. Make sure to visit Little Ubehebe Crater while stopping by as many visitors find it more photogenic and stunning than it’s larger namesake.

Distance: 2.2 miles roundtrip
Time: 1-2 hours

Little Ubehebe Crater

To get to Little Ubehebe Crater start at the parking lot and follow the rim trail to the right. Eventually you’ll find a turnoff for Little Ubehebe which is less than a mile walk on a nice path.

We found Little Ubehebe to be the more photogenic of the two and were glad we made the extra effort to hike over to it!

To learn more about this location check out our Ubehebe Crater post.


9. Cool off at Death Valley’s year-round waterfall, Darwin Falls

death valley in spring darwin falls
Darwin Falls | Things to Do Death Valley National Park

Darwin Falls

When we first heard there was a year-round waterfall in Death Valley National Park we thought it was too good to be true too. The trailhead to this waterfall starts just down the road from the Panamint Springs area of the park.

The whole way in keeps the suspense alive as to whether there is actually any water to be seen in the hottest place on earth.

Shortly down the trail however, a creek appears and the suspense builds. Seemingly out of nowhere song birds start singing, crickets start chirping, dragonflies begin buzzing, and even frogs start to croak!

Darwin Falls Hike

Distance: 1.9 miles roundtrip
Time: 1-2 hours

Looking down at what started as a tiny sliver of water one realizes that they are looking at a full blown creek now. And then it’s there – Darwin Falls in all her beauty.

We highly recommend this hike to everyone visiting the park as a great way to refresh, cool off, and witness a desert miracle firsthand.

To learn more about this location check out our Darwin Falls post.


10. Have the best sunrise in Death Valley all to yourself at Aguereberry Point

aguereberry point sunrise death valley national park
Sunrise from Aguereberry Point

Aguereberry Point

The most popular sunrise spot in Death Valley National Park is Zabriskie Point. However if you want to see the most spectacular (says us) sunrise in the park you’ll have to cross the valley and view it from the other side at Aguereberry Point.

Whereas Zabriskie faces away from the sun, Aguereberry Point looks directly at it creating a more dazzling display of colors and light to usher in the day.

Aguereberry is certainly more remote than Zabriskie and as a result far less crowded. When we visited we were the only ones there versus Zabriskie which is almost always packed.

Visitors can drive right up to the point without a hike.

To learn more about this location check out our Aguereberry Point.


11. Play a round or two at The Devils Golf Course

devils golf course best things to do death valley national park
The Devils Golf Course | Things to Do Death Valley

Devils Golf Course

Death Valley National Park is the king of things with morbid and foreboding names, like Devils Golf Course. Don’t let that deter you! Devils Golf Course is many park-goers favorite spot in the whole park.

Devils Golf Course is situated on the valley floor near Furnace Creek. Here the very earth itself seems tormented, twisted and cracked in all sorts of ways. It’s mesmerizing.

To learn more about this location check out our Devils Golf Course post.


12. Cross a dune field to discover an abandoned mine at Ibex Dunes

ibex dunes death valley national park
Ibex Dunes | Things to Do Death Valley National Park

Ibex Dunes are perhaps the most photogenic dunes in the park (right up there with Eureka Dunes) and almost as remote. These dunes are located on the southern end of the park off of a rough, high clearance road.

These dunes are a blast to explore but make sure to do so early as they heat up fast, even in winter, and can create dangerous situations for hikers.

ibex dunes death valley national park
Abandoned Mine at Ibex Dunes | Death Valley Things to Do

One of the coolest parts of exploring Ibex Dunes is finding the abandoned mine on the far side set against the mountains. This eery spot is a remnant of a bygone era for the park and makes for a great photo opportunity.

To learn more about this location check out our Ibex Dunes post.


13. Find some shade at Natural Bridge

natural bridge death valley national park
Hikers cross under Natural Bridge | Death Valley Things to Do

Natural Bridge

Natural Bridge is a pretty cool spot in Death Valley National Park featuring (drum roll) a natural bridge! This is a great hike to avoid direct sun by walking on the shadowy side of the canyon (depending on the time of day.

Natural Bridge Hike

Distance: 2 miles roundtrip
Time: 1-2 hours

The hike to the bridge is all uphill to the bridge and all downhill back to the parking lot, 1 mile each way. Once you get to the bridge the view back down the canyon is pretty cool giving one a great view of the valley in the distance.

To learn more about this location check out our Natural Bridge post.


14. Stargaze at Charcoal Kilns

charcoal kilns best things to do death valley national park
The night sky above Charcoal Kilns | What to Do Death Valley National Park

Charcoal Kilns

The Charcoal Kilns are a cool spot to visit, easily mistaken for an abandoned village of windowless conical, beehive shaped homes. The kilns were used back in the park’s mining days to create charcoal.

We decided to visit the kilns at night under a waxing moon to try and grab a cool night photo.

The kilns are located in the Wildrose section of the park. The road leading to the Charcoal Kilns is notoriously bad and high clearance vehicles are a MUST, if not 4wd.

To learn more about this location check out our Charcoal Kilns post.


15. Observe the faraway beauty of Panamint Dunes

panamint dunes death valley national park
Panamint Dunes at Sunset | Death Valley Things to Do

Panamint Dunes

The Panamint Dunes are a less-traveled dune field in Death Valley National Park that most visitors see from afar rather than actually visit themselves. The dune field is located in Panamint Valley and the trailhead for the dunes is accessed off of a long dirt road.

Panamint Dunes Hike

Distance: 7 miles roundtrip
Time: 3-4 hours

The hike to the dunes is a longer one at 7 miles and should only be attempted during cooler temperatures as the heat can turn life-threatening in a hurry.

To learn more about about this location check out our Panamint Dunes post.


16. Explore the unexpected sights in Surprise Canyon

surprise canyon death valley national park
Burros look on near the entrance of Surprise Canyon

Surprise Canyon

The aptly named Surprise Canyon is a real treat for Death Valley visitors featuring a lovely creek, some small waterfalls, and even burros! To get to the trailhead visitors must drive outside the park and then back up the canyon.

Suprise Canyon Hike

Distance: 6.3 miles roundtrip
Time: 3-4 hours

The hike itself is mostly uphill on the way up and mostly downhill on the way back. Every turn features new sites and adventures.

To learn more about this location check out our Surprise Canyon post.


17. Take a scenic drive through Death Valley

death valley national park california road trip
A long road through Death Valley National Park

Death Valley is the largest national park outside of Alaska. As such, there happens to be some very, very long drives throughout the park.

These drives can be split up between the ones that require 4WD and the ones that don’t. Regardless of whether you have 4WD capability there are so many great roads to explore in the park.

Driving Tips

Make sure you have a good spare tire if you’re heading off road and have a plan in case you break down. Service is spotty at best throughout the park and it can be a very long time before someone else comes across your vehicle.

Pack plenty of food & water and drive safe!

Planning a trip to Death Valley National Park? Learn how to do it right with our comprehensive Death Valley National Park Guide that covers what to see, campgrounds, lodging, dining, seasons & weather, and so much more.

> Death Valley National Park Guide <


18. See the sun rise over the snow-capped telescope peak

death valley in winter telescope peak
Sunrise on Telescope Peak

Telescope Peak is the highest point in Death Valley National Park and is regularly snow-capped! I never thought I would see snow in Death Valley so this was a real shocker for me.

Elevation: 11,043ft

One of the best places to see the sunrise over telescope peak is from just past the Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest off Hunter Mountain Road.


19. Find Death Valley’s Elusive Burros

surprise canyon death valley national park
Burros in Death Valley National Park

Imported by miners during the 19th century, burros are actually an invasive species to Death Valley National Park. As such the park service is actively working to reduce/remove the current population in the park.

Eventually these feral donkeys will be completely removed. Until then they are pretty cool to spot in the park. We saw several in Surprise Canyon and near the Wildrose area.

Drive slow and keep a keen eye out and there’s a good chance you’ll see some!


20. Watch a sandstorm race across the floor of Death Valley

death valley national park
A sandstorm at sunrise in Death Valley

One of the coolest and most mesmerizing things I’ve ever seen in Death Valley was a sandstorm at sunrise. The way the light illuminated the sand as it hurdled across the valley floor was spectacular.

It also hurt quite a bit as it got close so make sure to take cover if you see one approaching. High winds can sometimes pick up in the valley. When this happens seek higher ground and you just might get lucky!


21. Find amazing mud cracks on the valley floor of Death Valley

death valley national park california things to do mudcracks
The famous mud cracks at Death Valley National Park

Death Valley is famous for scenes like the one above – a valley floor beautifully cracked with geometric shapes. There are many places all over the valley floor where different shapes, colors and sizes of mud cracks can be found.

Where I Found the Best Mud Cracks in Death Valley

The best mud cracks in my opinion are located on the floor of Death Valley itself. Driving down the Badwater Road south of Furnace Creek there are lots of great spots.

Searching for the best ones is most of the fun!


Death Valley National Park Photos

We’ve taken over 20,000 photos during our time in Death Valley. We like to think some of them turned out pretty well!


Death Valley Map of Things to Do


Top 10 Things To Do in Death Valley National Park

  1. Eureka Dunes
  2. Badwater Basin
  3. Zabriskie Point
  4. Racetrack Playa
  5. Artists Palette
  6. Mesquite Flat Dunes
  7. Lee Flat Joshua Tree Forest
  8. Ubehebe Crater
  9. Darwin Falls
  10. Aguereberry Point

Top 20 Things To Do in Death Valley National Park

  1. Devils Golf Course
  2. Ibex Dunes
  3. Scenic Drive
  4. Sandstorm
  5. Burros
  6. Telescope Peak
  7. Surprise Canyon
  8. Panamint Dunes
  9. Charcoal Kilns
  10. Natural Bridge
  11. Mud Cracks

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Will Pattiz

Co-founder of More Than Just Parks. Husband. Conservationist. Currently living in NYC.

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